School Libraries – READER’S THEATRE -MORTIMER

Question 

Regarding the readers’ theatre activity…

  • What worked well?
  • What didn’t work well?
  • How would you improve or modify this event if you delivered it at a school library?

” CLANG, CLANG, RATTLE-BING-BANG, GONNA MAKE MY NOISE ALL DAY !” – ( Robert Munsch, 1985) 

Today in Client services I participated in Readers Theatre – Whoa, whoa ! let’s re-track here for a second, you  an eighteen year old, going to college to have a great career participated in a activity that’s meant for kids under ten or so ? Aren’t you suppose to be learning on how to catalogue Dewey ? – Not entirely . Reader’s theatre is a great supporter for readers  especially for beginners to be engage in a text of written work using their voices, body language and interpreting their emotions by not memorizing the text. Usually a teacher or librarian will read the story ( my teacher read the amazing fun book called ” Mortimer”- a boy who would not go to sleep when his parents and siblings tells him too,causing so much ruckus !) Then hand 0ut a script with given part to student to practice and then create a voice for that particular part while re reading the book.  The activity is super duper fun to participate and help students/readers to read and engage more.

What I thought work well was that everyone had a part either primary character/s ( Mortimer)or secondary characters ( Mom, Dad, all seventeen brothers and sisters, police officers) no one was left out. Everyone in my class had some part to play and engage in the activity. Sue, my teacher had chosen a familiar book that we all relate too whether you read Robert munsch as a kid, your favorite book by him, the topic ( when you were a kid, did you have trouble falling asleep or did you make such ruckus because you did not want to go to sleep? ) or really like picture books. She even read the book first, giving each character a voice, body movement ( stomping her feet ) to make enjoyable for the class. I like how after she handed out scripts and gave everyone a role to participate in. For me , that work perfectly because as a kid, I read all the time, I had no problem having trouble picking up a book and reading and interpreting just fine. HOWEVER,  I just could not read in front of the class or participated in activities such as this one because I was petrified of using my voice. I have a learning disability that makes learning very difficult to understand certain things or speak. I had to go to a speech therapist because I could not say my TH’S, S’S  or spells words. To this day, I still have trouble with my grammar, punctuation and spelling because my brain works slower to process information than most people. I was afraid to say a sentence because kids use to laugh at me when I stutter on a word when I had to read out loud. Yet, this activity help me gain confidence for when I had to present in class as I got over because I would have to memorize what I was going to say and some.

What I thought did not work well was the fact not everyone knew when to say there lines. They weren’t following the script so there were a lot of unnecessary pauses when they should have been following the script. Also even though everyone had a part to participate I felt the lines were curt and short, not long enough to give the students to get into character.

What would I do to improve if I were to deliver at a school library, I would give students or reader to go over the scripts in advance and to give them all equal parts and give them different scenarios, such as using more than one book from robert munsch like ZOOM.

Work citation 

Munsch, R. (2015). The Official Website of Robert Munsch. Retrieved October 28, 2015, http://robertmunsch.com/book/mortimerhttp://robertmunsch.com/books

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About Librarian information and Tech at Durham

Librarian Information and Tech
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